[Video Review] Sony a7III after 10 months

Sony a7III longterm review
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It’s been 10 months now since I made the switch from a DSLR to a mirrorless camera. In that time, I’ve shot about 20 weddings all over the world… traveling carry-on-only every time :-)

So here’s the big question: after 10 months with the Sony a7III, do I regret my decision to leave my trusty Nikon D750?

Or moreover, do I miss shooting with a DSLR since switching to mirrorless?

I put together this video in an attempt to help anyone who’s in the same position that I was in at the beginning of 2018 – should you switch to mirrorless?

Right up until the end of my experiences with DSLRs, I was happy with my Nikon D750. 4 years on, there’s no doubt that the D750 is still a great camera (see the review here), and now it’s available for an absolute steal of a price (see here).

However, there’s no denying the fact that the technology in all DSLR cameras is a little, well, dated. As much as I love using DSLRs, I found myself wanting to take advantage of the technical advancements of the latest mirrorless cameras.

In particular, I wanted an EVF and a ‘proper’ Live View. Being able to see exposure adjustments in real time is a much more efficient way to take photos, and using a DSLR in Live View is a clunky and frustrating experience – especially so on non-flagship DSLRs such as the D750.

So, the question remains: after 10 months shooting solely with the Sony a7III both for professional and personal work, will I be staying with Sony?

Or will I switch to the Nikon Z or Canon R mirrorless camera systems in 2019?

Watch my video review of the Sony a7III below to find out, and leave me a comment with your thoughts!

Get the Sony a7III Here

(Where I bought mine)
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  • Hi, it’s always good to get unbiased reviews so many thanks for sharing the video. It came at a perfect time for me as I’m giving very serious consideration to switching from Canon (5D mkIII x 2 + Primes) for much the same reasons (eye autofocus and low light particularly) either in part (keeping 2 systems running) or in stages and keen to get some real world experience on the use of the Sigma MC-11 with the 85 1.2 / 50 1.2 (I’m assuming there’s no issue with Sigma’s own Art 35 1.4) on the A7 III.

    There are other considerations – the smaller size is both good and bad, my total familiarity and comfort with Canon but overall, as things stand today, the pro’s of switching – eye autofocus and low light performance versus the 5D MkIII – outweigh the cons..however, should the MC-11 not deliver on the focusing front with existing EF primes, this would have to be a major consideration also..?

    Any further insights and thoughts would be welcomed!

      • Hi Mark – of course, it was somewhat of a rambling query!

        What I’d like to know is have you used the A7iii with 3rd party lenses (eg. Canon 85mm f/1.2 or EF mount Sigma 35mm f/1.4) via the MC-11 adaptor?

        I’m keen to get some feedback on the use of Canon/EF lenses with the adaptor in faster paced commercial situations (such as weddings), as opposed to in-store demos or more casual test environments.

        If the adaptor/lens combination performs it would allow me some flexibility in what I do eg:

        1. Run Canon and Sony bodies side by side retaining EF lenses

        2. Switch in stages until I’m sure the Sony system is right for me i.e. keep all Canon kit initially and introduce Sony A7 III body first

        As I’d mentioned, whilst I am very comfortable and familiar with Canon – the progress made in terms of weight reduction, autofocus and low light performance with the Sony A7 III is a major draw for me (as it is for everyone else!).

        I know a lot of this will be subjective – so long story short, in your opinion would the use of adapted lenses compromise the performance too much to warrant using them on the A7 III?

        Thanks in advance!

        • Thanks for clarifying David! I haven’t had any experience of using adapted lenses on the Sony in professional usage. From my limited time spent playing with the MetaBones adapter and some Canon glass, what I would say is that native lenses are always better. If you consider that Sony never tests adapted lenses on its bodies (at least officially), then expecting them to be as good as their native ones is a bit optimistic.

          Having said this, if you absolutely have to have the L glass look in your Sony images, there isn’t another way around it. The alternative of course is the Canon EOS R, which is a great camera, but can’t beat the a7III in some key areas – AF performance most notably. Hope that helps!

          • Thanks Mark – optimistic is probably the best description.. plenty of food for thought. Great website by the way.. a super resource I’m very happy to have discovered.

      • Yeah, pretty impartial and practical review which is appreciated. I’m torn between the Z6 and a7iii and your video was very helpful.