[Video Review] Sony a7III after 10 months

Sony a7III longterm review

It’s been 10 months now since I made the switch from a DSLR to a Sony mirrorless camera. In that time, I’ve shot about 20 weddings all over the world… traveling carry-on-only every time :-)

So here’s the big question: after 10 months with the Sony a7III, do I regret my decision to leave my trusty Nikon D750?

Or moreover, do I miss shooting with a DSLR since switching to mirrorless?

I put together this video in an attempt to help anyone who’s in the same position that I was in at the beginning of 2018 – should you switch to mirrorless?

Right up until the end of my experiences with DSLRs, I was happy with my Nikon D750. 4 years on, there’s no doubt that the D750 is still a great camera (see the review here), and now it’s available for an absolute steal of a price (see here).

However, there’s no denying the fact that the technology in all DSLR cameras is a little, well, dated. As much as I love using DSLRs, I found myself wanting to take advantage of the technical advancements of the latest mirrorless cameras.

In particular, I wanted an EVF and a ‘proper’ Live View. Being able to see exposure adjustments in real time is a much more efficient way to take photos, and using a DSLR in Live View is a clunky and frustrating experience – especially so on non-flagship DSLRs such as the D750.

So, the question remains: after 10 months shooting solely with the Sony a7III both for professional and personal work, will I be staying with Sony?

Or will I switch to the Nikon Z or Canon R mirrorless camera systems in 2021?

Watch my video review of the Sony a7III below to find out, and leave me a comment with your thoughts!

[Related: Best Sony a7iii lenses]
 

Get the Sony a7III Here

(Where I bought mine)

Disclaimer: All recommendations are impartial and based on user experience, with no bias to the products or the brand. The products in this post may contain affiliate links.

Mark Condon

Mark Condon is a British wedding photographer based in Australia and the founder of Shotkit.